An exploration of the gender system of the Wakerewe: towards a dialogue for attitude change

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Date
2009
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
University of Dar es Salaam
Abstract
The study’s main concern was to investigate the cultural ideologies and assumptions, which are the sources of attitudes, practices and identities that values or devalue men and women in society. Convinced that action research dialogue exposes the truth of gender issues, enables change of attitudes and guides the search for possible ways out in specific cultures and Context Theoretical Framework (CCTF) to explore, gather data, analyze and identify entry points of the Kerewe gender system to be used in further dialogues for possible change of attitudes to manage gender disparities. The findings showed that the ideologies on personhood and morality enable the formation of personhood identity and guide that male and female are treated as persons. The study identified these ideologies as useful entry points for negotiating for a gender equal society and foundation stones to build on the relations that are more humane. Also, the findings revealed that the formation of particular identities of males and females that eventually lead to the binary oppositions in matters of power and resources. The study identified these ideologies as useful entry points for counter- attitudinal advocacy to enable the Wakerewe rethink their polarized identities and sort out specific gender problems. While concluding that the Kerewe culture is already in transition and its cultural ideology is flexible and disposed to accommodate gender issues, the study calls for active change agents to guide and complement it with the sets of values oriented toward human well-being.
Description
Available in print form, East Africana Collection, Dr. Wilbert Chagula Library, Class Mark (THS EAF HQ1075.5.T34M39)
Keywords
Gender system, Kerewe (African people)
Citation
Mazigo, A (2009) An exploration of the gender system of the Wakerewe: towards a dialogue for attitude change, Master dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam