The impact of divorce on children’s education in public primary schools in Tanzania: the case of Southern Unguja Region

dc.contributor.authorMussa, Farida H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-12T13:51:49Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T09:13:21Z
dc.date.available2019-07-12T13:51:49Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T09:13:21Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.descriptionAvailable in print formen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed at investigating the impact of divorce on children’s education in public primary schools in Southern Unguja Region. Three research objectives and three related tasks guided the study which focused on the impact of single-parent family on children’s education, impact of non-resident father on children’s education and the impact of other family members on children’s education. Wide ranges of literature on impact of divorce on children’s education were reviewed and the study was guided by Wright “Sociological Theory” of 2007. The study was conducted in 4 public primary schools and involved 56 respondents who were categorized into pupils, parents (divorced mothers) and other family members (relatives). Data were gathered through interviews, focus group discussions, questionnaires, observations and documentary reviews. Qualitative data were organized into categories, themes and were interpreted. Also data were presented in the form of tables for the sake of summarizing the information. Quantitative data were computed into frequencies and percentage and also presented in the forms of tables whenever considered necessary. The study findings revealed that pupils from divorced families lived in difficult situations which were caused by living with divorced unemployed mothers with little or no financial support from fathers, relatives and even step-fathers. Moreover, the impact of divorce on children’s education is shown by variables such as: getting poor grade of total average marks of all subjects, poor attendance in school, coming late to school thus lacking timely punctuality behavior, pupils having shortage of school materials, sleeping in the class during the lessons and lack of concentration on learning and not participating fully in school sports activities. The study recommends that both parents should have proportional responsibilities to children. Government and NGOs concerned with children’s welfare should strongly help and support these children in their education. It is also recommended that schools should have guidance and counseling services for helping these children during and after school hours. The study recommends a similar study on a wider context in area and schools for foliating generalizable results and policy implications.en_US
dc.identifier.citationMussa, F.H(2012),The impact of divorce on children’s education in public primary schools in Tanzania: the case of Southern Unguja Region, master dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam (available athttp://41.86.178.3/internetserver3.1.2/detail.aspx)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/4076
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Dar es Salaamen_US
dc.subjectDivorceen_US
dc.subjectChildren's educationen_US
dc.subjectPrimary schoolen_US
dc.subjectTanzaniaen_US
dc.titleThe impact of divorce on children’s education in public primary schools in Tanzania: the case of Southern Unguja Regionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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