Effects of participatory teaching methods on the students’ learning outcomes at ordinary level secondary school in Tanzania: the case of Mathematics and Biology

dc.contributor.authorMuhangwa, Godfrey Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-10T20:58:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-08T09:13:00Z
dc.date.available2016-06-10T20:58:21Z
dc.date.available2020-01-08T09:13:00Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.descriptionAvailable in print formen_US
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzed the effects of participatory teaching methods on the students’ learning outcomes in secondary schools in Tanzania, Case study of three public schools in Nyamagana district in Mwanza region. The study methodology based on both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. The sample comprised of 111 respondents. The methods of data collection were questionnaires, interview guide, observational checklist, direct observation, focus group discussion and documentary review. The findings indicated that teachers still relied on the talk and chalk method which impede classroom interactions during the teaching and learning process. Overloaded curriculum, class size, quality of teachers, attitude of students toward Mathematics and Biology, poor knowledge of participatory teaching methods and language barrier inhibited the use of participatory teaching methods in teaching and learning process. All the sampled schools had inadequate teaching and learning facilities such as library, laboratory, textbooks, supplementary and reference books, teachers-guide, models, infrastructures and science equipments. This made teachers to select the teaching methods which suited their teaching; the most easily selected was the lecture method so as to attain their target which was to complete the syllabus. Most of the teachers had not attended in-service training to help them demonstrate proper use of participatory teaching and learning methods for teachers lacked the new skills and knowledge in terms of teaching techniques and learners’ involvement. Many students lacked confidence, obedience and commitments in studying Mathematics and Biology. The study recommends that the government, among others, has to ensure there is adequate provision of teaching and learning materials in secondary schools, in service trainings, seminars and workshops. It is also recommended that there is need for adequate investment in education, competent teachers and adequate infrastructures. More importantly, it is necessary to avoid lowering down entrance qualifications, teachers’ and students’ commitments in teaching and learning Mathematics and Biology subjects and teachers’ motivation. The logic behind teachers’ motivation is that they directly impact on the learning outcomes.en_US
dc.identifier.citationMuhangwa, G.M (2011) Effects of participatory teaching methods on the students’ learning outcomes at ordinary level secondary school in Tanzania: the case of Mathematics and Biology master dissertation, University of Dar es Salaam. Available at http://41.86.178.3/internetserver3.1.2/detail.aspxen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://localhost:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/3945
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Dar es Salaamen_US
dc.subjectSecondary schoolen_US
dc.subjectTeachingen_US
dc.subjectMathematicsen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectMwanza regionen_US
dc.subjectTanzaniaen_US
dc.titleEffects of participatory teaching methods on the students’ learning outcomes at ordinary level secondary school in Tanzania: the case of Mathematics and Biologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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