Prevalence and intensity of geohelminths among primary school children and related factors in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam.

dc.contributor.authorTarimo, Anastasia Martini
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-15T09:17:42Z
dc.date.available2020-12-15T09:17:42Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.descriptionAvailable in print form, East Africana Collection, Dr. Wilbert Chagula Library, Class mark (THS EAF QL392.T37)en_US
dc.description.abstractA cross sectional study was carried out between February and March 1998 in Temeke district. The aim was to determine the prevalence and intensity of soil transmitted helminthes among primary school children aged 6to18 years and related factors. A simple random sampling method was used to select one primary school whereby all school children in that school were supposed to participate in this study. Out of 350 school children of that school, 290 school children participated in the study while the remaining 60 children did not participate for some reasons. Stool samples were collected and processed by modified Kato-Katz method to determine the egg count. All children found with soil transmitted helminthes were treated with Albendazole and post-chemotherapy stools were collected over 48 hours and 72 hours to recover the expelled worms. The soil sample were taken from different places and processed by Baermann techniques to determine the ova and filariforn larva of soil transmitted helminthes. Questionnaires were administered to school children and teachers to assess their hygiene and awareness of the geohelminths. Data were analysed using SSPS and EPI- Info software. Results showed that soil transmitted helminthes are a health problem to school children. The overall prevalence of A. lumbricoides was 4.1% with a mean egg count of 192 eggs per gramme of faces and a mean worm burden of 4 worms per child. The overall prevalence of hookworm was 22.4% with a mean egg count of 183 eggs per gramme of faces and the mean worm per child. The overall prevalence of T.trichiura was 0.7% and that of S. stercolaris together with E. vernicularis was 1.7%. the results of soil samples showed that 45% of 60 samples were found with geohelminths. Hand washing behaviour and wearing of shoes had no association with the infection. It was concluded that although each school child knew at least one mode of transmission of soil transmitted helminthes and prevention, the problem still remain in school children because they are living with the risk factors of infection. Therefore, it is recommended that the relevant authorities should have to find some mechanism of reducing the geohelminths infection. It is also recommended to treat all school children during deworming programme without mind they are infected or not infected with geohelminths.en_US
dc.identifier.citationTarimo, A.M. (1999) Prevalence and intensity of geohelminths among primary school children and related factors in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam, Master dissertation, University of Dar es Salaamen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://41.86.178.5:8080/xmlui/handle/123456789/13870
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Dar es Salaamen_US
dc.subjectHelminthsen_US
dc.subjectGeohelminthsen_US
dc.subjectSchool childrenen_US
dc.subjectDar es Salaam (Tanzania)en_US
dc.subjectTemeke districten_US
dc.titlePrevalence and intensity of geohelminths among primary school children and related factors in Temeke District, Dar es Salaam.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
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